Image

Archive for Students

To Every Thing There Is a Season

If there is one thing that is constant in life, it is change. We all know it’s going to happen, and yet we carry on as if things will always remain the same. Sometimes, we embrace change. It can come as a relief and be a very positive thing. But sometimes, we struggle with change. It upsets the world in which we live and brings about that terrible fear of the unknown. About the only thing we can control is how we respond to change. As Bob Dylan says, “…you better start swimming or you’ll sink like a stone, for the times they are a-changing”.

Lately, I’ve been experiencing the pain of going through a lot of changes at work. We recently lost our headmaster, and only last week I found out my principal was also leaving. To top it off, my closest friend at school (who is also our Fine Arts Director) is moving to California. “Change” doesn’t feel good right now. These are not changes that I’m excited about. I love these people and don’t want to see them go. I realize, however, that the only thing I can control now is how I respond to these impending changes. I am excited for each of these wonderful people as they travel to their new schools and begin new chapters of their lives. It’s also time for me to open a new chapter of my life as well. It’s time to swim.

For the past six years, I’ve had the privilege of being a one act play clinician and adjudicator. I’m always impressed with the tenacity of one act play directors and students. They attend each clinic and contest seeking to improve, and they return to their schools, eager to make the changes needed to strengthen their shows and become better storytellers. The point of the clinics and contests is to grow, to continue to work hard and to effect positive change in a production. Directors and their students have to swim or sink, and I’ve witnessed many times the commitment to just keep swimming no matter how many obstacles are encountered. I’ve seen Facebook posts about directors experiencing frustrating and sometimes even devastating setbacks. I’ve witnessed directors encouraging and supporting one another and also act in ways to comfort and display incredible love to their students. I’ve observed companies demonstrate class, dignity, and good sportsmanship after the disappointment of not advancing or the heartbreak of disqualification. You don’t hear this enough, but thank you, directors, for choosing to swim when you’re faced with the sink or swim choice. What you do for your students each year is so very valuable. You are teaching them not only a love for theatre, but also lessons in life. As your students watch you, they learn how to adapt when faced with difficult situations, be resourceful, deal with stress, accept wins and mourn losses, collaborate, find joy, and heal heartache. Yes, the play you choose may resonate with your students, but directors are the navigators of not only the story you tell on stage, but also the story you create with your students. The story of your one act play 2017 company journey will be one that students will remember long after plaques and medals are gathering dust on a shelf. Never underestimate the impact that can have on a young life or that they can have on you. Before long, they will graduate and be off to their next life adventure. Life will change.

I’m not usually an overly-sentimental or wistful person. I know my current feelings have a lot to do with the upcoming changes at my school, but there is a far greater reason for my melancholy. I received word this past weekend that one of my former students passed away on Saturday. She graduated in 2005, making her around the age of 29 or 30. Kaye was our backstage wonder. I would hear her name called frequently when actors needed help. “Kaye, my button came off of my shirt”, “Kaye, I think I split my pants”, “Kaye, do you know where my prop is”, “Kaye….”. The guys in the cast would randomly call her name at times, playfully teasing her just to see if she would come to the rescue, and she would faithfully come to their aid, just in case they really needed help. I have such fond memories of a smiling girl with a small sewing kit, a stopwatch, a mini flashlight, and a small first aid kit stashed away in a fanny pack and ready to go in case she had to jump into action. The passing of a young person is hard to swallow. We just assume we’re going to outlive our theatre kids. Kaye is the age of two of my own children and was a classmate of theirs. Although I haven’t seen her in years, we remained a part of each other’s lives through Facebook. And it was on Facebook, within hours of learning of Kaye’s passing that one of my other friends posted a link to Idina Menzel and Kristin Chenoweth singing the song For Good from the fabulous musical Wicked. I thought to myself, “Don’t click on that link. Do not listen to that song right now”, and then found myself clicking, and sobbing, as Stephen Schwartz ‘s amazingly appropriate lyrics were masterfully sung. I’m going to post them below. It may remind you of someone who has changed you for good. Let it remind us as teachers to leave our handprints on the hearts of those we’re blessed to touch each day. Change is out of our control. How we choose to respond to it isn’t. Lisa, Joy, and Kaye, this is for you…

“I’ve heard it said
That people come into our lives for a reason
Bringing something we must learn
And we are led
To those who help us most to grow
If we let them
And we help them in return
Well, I don’t know if I believe that’s true
But I know I’m who I am today
Because I knew you…
Like a comet pulled from orbit
As it passes a sun
Like a stream that meets a boulder
Halfway through the wood
Who can say if I’ve been changed for the better?
But because I knew you
I have been changed for good.

It well may be
That we will never meet again
In this lifetime
So let me say before we part
So much of me
Is made of what I learned from you
You’ll be with me
Like a handprint on my heart
And now whatever way our stories end
I know you have re-written mine
By being my friend…” (Stephen Schwartz)

Preparation: Key Element to Contest Season

Key to SuccessAs I write this, I am listening to my students singing Bohemian Rhapsody in the dressing rooms down the hall.   They just closed the curtain to the matinee performance and will begin preparing for the evening performance after a short break.  Apparently, this is one of their traditions at the close of a show; although a student just informed me this was supposed to happen after closing night and not after the matinee.   I am still learning their pre-performance and post-performance rituals while trying to incorporate the preparation I feel they need to grow as performers and a department.

While we still have two more musical performances, I am mentally preparing for the next productions.  In one class we are halfway through blocking , Reckless, by Craig Lucas.  In my Theatre I classes, we are beginning talk theatre.  After school, we begin auditions for our competition show.  Such is the life of a high school theatre teacher.  Saying good-bye to this show is much easier with so much to organize for the rest of the year.

Unfortunately, along with preparation for UIL One-Act Play contest season comes the dreaded play selection and auditions.   I hate both. What if I choose the wrong show?  What if I do not cast it right?  This is the part of the process that I do not like.  I cannot decide what entrée to order at a restaurant, think how hard it is for me to make a decision about what play I want to be married to for the next few months – much less which students will best fulfill those roles.

Today, I want to share my thoughts about beginning a competition season and share some of my own processes.  Since I have not been a “solo” director in a while, I am trying to remember what all needs to be done, re-create contracts and calendars, as well as, teach my students my way of doing this.   I am very thankful for the new Maestro Production Process Guidebook with sample calendars, contracts and reminders of all the things I need to do.   This will surely simplify my preparation for the competition season.

Yesterday, I began the process.  I posted audition dates.  It is strange to post them in November, but with contest the first week in March, I need to get started.  I posted five audition dates.  I am not one who does one to two days of auditions.  Remember, I have a hard time making up my mind!  I want to be able to really trust my decision.  During this time, I will do some improv activities, creating situations that I might need in the play.  I will do some theatre games to see who are leaders, who are followers, and, mostly, who are team players.  I will assign some semi-cold readings where I give a group a scene and ten minutes to rehearse it.  They will return to perform the scene without scripts.  I will not ask them to memorize, I want them to create characters and conflict.  My newest, and favorite audition tactic, I learned from Maestro workshops.  I will give each a stereotype that fits the characters I am looking for.  The student will create the silhouette of that character and deliver one line.  This lets me know what they can do physically, as well as, vocally.  It also shows me what students are willing to take risks and can create on their own.

Okay, so I have the dates posted.  Tomorrow, I will spend the day creating my audition packet.  It will contain my expectations, calendars, rehearsal uniform, a contract to be signed by parents and students, student information, a grade check, expectations for travel attire, and I may add a teacher recommendation form since I am just learning about my new students.  I gained a wealth of knowledge about the work ethic and responsibility of the students in the musical, but many of my students did not audition for the musical because they cannot sing or dance.  I need some sort of gauge for their responsibility level and work ethic.  I am thinking a teacher recommendation might be helpful.  Plus, it puts responsibility in their hands, and it can be the first thing to see if they follow through with a directive.  Same with the contract, it must be signed and returned by the deadline.

The next step is beginning the audition and determining the play.  Yes, I said that right.  I do not know, for sure, what play I am auditioning.  I know that is not the normal procedure for some people.  You should have seen the look on students’ faces as they asked what play they are auditioning for and I said, “I’m not sure, yet.”  I told them they have to trust me.  I have 3-4 scripts that I am considering.   I will audition all of them to determine what script fits the kids best.  I am leaning heavily on an Arthur Miller script (yes with a porch) but I have very physical students who are naturally comedic, so I am also looking at some scripts that meet those criteria.  I think a huge mistake is choosing a play and trying to make your students fit those roles.

During this audition process, as I narrow down my script choices, I will assign the stereotype silhouette and give a line to memorize.  I may give a monologue for memorization.  It all depends on what I need to see in order to make my decision.  Sometimes, I need to see a monologue or see that they are committed enough to prepare a monologue.  Sometimes, I feel this is a waste of my time.  I am as involved in the audition process as the students, I adapt based on what I feel is needed with that group of students auditioning at that time.

During the audition process, I will interview students.  I want to hear what their expectations are, what they feel are their strengths and weaknesses, and why they are interested in representing our school in this contest.   This is time consuming but worth the investment.  It sometimes clarifies my decision and I think many times, it makes the casting decision easier for a student to accept.  They sometimes see themselves in roles that do not fit them physically nor work within the current ensemble.  Sometimes, I have re-visited my own ideas to look at roles through a new lens suggested by a student.

Remember, I mentioned teaching my new students my process.   I require technicians to attend all auditions, which is a new practice for them.  They are handed a contract and participate in the improv activities and the games.   I am casting a company and I need to see that they are as committed as the actors.  This is new for my new school where technicians do not attend rehearsals until the end of the rehearsal process and sometimes do not even know the names of the actors.  I have had a few technicians in my office panicked over this requirement.  I, again, told them to trust me, it will all work out with a rewarding outcome.

I am tired as we close our musical, but I am excited about the future.  I have watched students grow in the past six weeks through this production and I look forward to watching them grow in the next production.  I know tomorrow, I would love to veg-out on the couch and watch the Cowboys, but I know I need to prepare for auditions.  Maybe, I can get my contracts, calendars and expectations together as I watch some football.

 

So, Your Child Wants to Major in Theatre?  

It’s that time of year again. Many seniors are going through the process of making very two important decisions. The selection of a university and the commitment to a major can be both exciting and stressful for students, but I’ve found that it’s every bit as agonizing for the parents of these young people. After all, most parents will be making a huge monetary investment in their children’s college educations and future careers. They want to feel confident that their money is well spent, and to be honest, many of them are not so sure that will be the case when they hear the words, “Mom, Dad, I am going to major in theatre!”.

In their defense, most people are not aware of the impact of a good arts education and the range of skills a strong program will develop in a student of theatre. Just take a look at Wells Fargo’s current “Teen Day” campaign which features today’s “actor” and “ballerina” abandoning their individual art forms to become tomorrow’s “botanist” and “engineer”. The ad paints the arts as a passing fancy, nothing more than a hobby to be pursued before a student learns about important fields of study. It sends a message to young people and their parents:  the arts are to be practiced when you’re a child, but once you grow up, you need to find a “real” career. I recently spoke with mothers of two of my seniors, both of whom are planning to major in theatre. One mother was completely comfortable with the idea of her son’s intended major. She also has a daughter entering her sophomore year of college as a theatre major. The other mother was concerned. After researching the average salary of a working actor, she was distressed to learn that her son would potentially be making a salary below the poverty level. She had also, however, dug deeper and found a plethora of information supporting an arts education. Our conversation inspired me to do a little research of my own, and what I found made me laugh, made me cry, and took me for a walk down memory lane. But more about that later…

Our discussion about this topic continued when I received an email from my student’s mother last week. She had found a blog titled “10 Ways Being a Theatre Major Prepared Me for Success by Tom Vander Well. The following is a link to his blog: https://tomvanderwell.wordpress.com/2012/01/16/10-ways-being-a-theatre-major-prepared-me-for-success/ . I encourage you to read it. It presents an outstanding case for the pursuit of a degree in Theatre and how it impacted his career (which doesn’t happen to be in the world of theatre). When I saw the title of the blog, I decided I wanted to make my own list before reading his. I actually wrote a total of twelve ways I believed majoring in theatre would prepare a student for success, and then began comparing my list to his. I was astonished at how similar they are. The wording may have been different, but we came to basically the same conclusions. You might want to try it for yourself by making a list of your own prior to reading my list or his blog.

12 Ways Being a Theatre Major Will Prepare You for Success

  1. Collaboration
  2. Professionalism
  3. Passion/Enthusiasm
  4. Work Ethic
  5. Self-confidence
  6. Communication Skills
  7. Empathy
  8. Creativity
  9. Problem Solving
  10. Flexibility/Adaptability
  11. Resourcefulness
  12. Ability to multi-task in a fast paced environment

After making my list and reading Mr. Vander Well’s blog, I thought back to a book I read last summer, Creative Schools by Dr. Ken Robinson. He discussed how in 2008, IBM had published a survey of characteristics their leaders needed most in their teams. Two priorities emerged: adaptability to change and creativity in generating new ideas. Leaders who were surveyed had commented that these qualities were lacking in otherwise highly qualified graduates. Both of those skills made my list of twelve qualities. Mr. Vander Well also had several qualities listed that involved both creativity and adaptability. Yet these qualities aren’t measured on all those standardized tests that are given each year, leaving the impression that they’re not particularly valued. They are, in fact, qualities that are stigmatized or marginalized in some classroom settings, and yet these very important skills are learned and practiced daily by theatre students in classrooms across the nation.

I wanted to put the list I compiled to the test, asking my former theatre students for feedback. I posted the following on Facebook: “I’m interested to hear your take on how (if at all) having a theatre education and/or participation in theatre productions has helped you in your career/job.” Many of these students did not pursue the arts after high school, but there are a few artists in the group. Among the participants are an attorney, a nurse, businessmen and businesswomen, a sales representative, a real estate agent and former Chairwoman of the Contractors Safety Network at ExxonMobil, a customer service representative, an artist, an actor, an opera singer, an IT Specialist, an elementary teacher, a high school teacher, an adjunct faculty member and field supervisor for a Texas university, an airline transport pilot and owner of a Gyrocopter business, a jewelry store owner and designer, a long-term care provider relations advocate, a computer technician, and a stay-at-home mom. Reconnecting with them while reading their reactions filled my heart with many beautiful memories and filled my eyes with a few happy tears. Although some of the responders are just a few years younger than I am, they’ll always be my “kids”. And they reiterated what I already knew. Some of their reactions utilized words lifted straight from my list or straight from Tom Vander Well’s list; lists they’d never seen before. Here is a condensed version of their individual responses:

“From being involved in theatre, I learned the comfort of being in front of a crowd, the ease of mingling with and talking to people, and honestly, it helped make interviews a breeze. It gave me so much confidence.”

“Working with set design and makeup gave me the experience I needed to become a successful artist.”

“Being involved in theatre helped to enhance my verbal and written communication. It gave me a confidence I don’t think I’d have otherwise.”

“I was very unsure of myself, and I was incredibly afraid of failure. I was able to overcome those things. Along with my parents and family, I credit theatre with shaping me into the person I am.”

“Thanks to my involvement with theatre, I had no fear when I chaired the Contractors Safety Network at ExxonMobil and stood weekly in front of 400 managers, all men, all old enough to be my dad!  I was prepared and confident every single time. It has carried over into all aspects of my adult life.”

“Theatre gave me the confidence to speak in front of large audiences. It showed me the value of being prepared as well as how to continue rolling with things when things don’t go as planned.”

“It taught me to speak loudly, confidently, and clearly. Theatre teaches body awareness and nonverbal communication skills and how to work as a team member. It teaches how leadership and partnership aren’t too far from each other. One of my favorite things theatre teaches is when you help others in your ensemble, you are really helping yourself. You also learn to be flexible. Things won’t always go as planned.”

“It made me feel comfortable to talk to people. And now I’m a nurse and have to talk to people every day.”

“Theatre helped me in my professional life more than most subjects. I majored in business, and I excelled at presentations. In fact, I was offered a great job my last semester of college because of one of my presentations. I was also offered a promotion after a great presentation. Theatre and UIL competitions were key in my professional and personal success.”

“It helped me be more comfortable in my skin.”

“I had no idea how fun it would be! Theatre helped me become more confident and expressive. Now that I’m a teacher, I get in front of my students and act every day! I found the niche I’d been looking for since middle school. I definitely think ALL students could benefit from speech/theatre.”

“I was also involved in band and choir throughout middle and high school, but that can’t compare to the lessons I learned from theatre. Theatre gave me a backbone and a platform to be a more confident me. It was my safe place, my home, where I fit best.”

“Theatre was the first place I felt safe being vulnerable. It was the first place I had to truly trust in the group. We supported each other. It helped me to learn to interact with people who were very different from me. I gained an amazing base of life skills I use every single day as an adult.”

“I loved improvisation. It helped me to think on my feet, create an idea quickly and completely, and learn how to read an audience, all skills I use when working with my clients as a computer technician. I was also in band, and I still love music, but I don’t play my clarinet anymore. I still use the theatre lessons I learned daily! As an added bonus, theatre opens a world of literature up and gave even this avid reader more material to explore!”

“I would definitely say that my flair for performance, fostered on stage in high school, proves useful for litigation in law.”

“Out of all my childhood experiences, I remember having a great family apart from my real family.”

“I became an elementary teacher and having that theatrical background helped me unleash my creative side.”

Well, there you go. My “kids” confirmed what I knew all along. A theatre education is invaluable. I truly don’t believe you can put a price on what our students learn when studying theatre and participating in productions. So, your child wants to major in theatre?  I say, congratulations! I’m sure you’ve heard the saying, “Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life”. If your child loves theatre, he or she will find a way to make a living doing it. Lots of people have. I did, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything else. Many thanks to my wonderful former students, my forever kiddos, for participating in my survey. I love and miss you all.

Washington DC Needs More Verbs

Rick Washington DC

The following is a message I sent to a fellow teacher and dear friend,

“Hi JJ. Thank you for the wonderful resources you provided to help me prepare my words for my trip to DC. My trip was exciting, but I am sad to report that I left feeling very small in the world of bureaucracy. I appreciated the opportunity to share my stories and my experiences. Secretary John B. King Jr. is a kind and gentle soul. He was attentive and I saw the same concern in his face as I see in my dad’s face; they care for their children. But the words I heard from other educators in the room were the same stories of frustration I’ve heard in faculty meetings for the past 37 years. All the teachers there were passionate; a few were prolific and hinted at solutions. I was saddened because it was a gathering of great ideas, but no real discussion of what to do with those great ideas, or more accurately, how to fund those great ideas. I cried a lot yesterday. I felt sad for kids who get lost. I felt sad for schools that lose funding and get closed. I felt sad for Secretary King because the federal government’s relationship with the states and districts is complicated. I thought public school was bad, I discovered Washington DC is bureaucracy on steroids.”

JJ’s reply,

“I’m sorry to hear that Rick. I understand and I cry often too. But remember that sometimes we can’t change the ‘outside’ world. The only way to change things is to create our own small worlds and allow them to ripple out. The outside world is corrupt with greed and warped notions. But when some small movement begins and finds success, it takes hold and can’t be stopped. Every movement in the world started with a handful of people, you know that. From revolutions to the Renaissance. Did you know that many movements started with a group of students taught by the same teacher? Or a group of free thinkers in a pub? They didn’t try to change the world that existed around them. They created their own world…and it spread because the world was ripe for change. Don’t worry about old paradigms. When new worlds are created, the old worlds crumble. Focus on creating your world, the one you have been building all along. That is the future. It will happen. This is the way change happens. Ab intra. From within.”

JJ Jonas teaches at Salado High School in Salado, TX. She is one of the most creative and dynamic individuals I know. “Focus on creating your world,” she advised me. I love writing and receiving letters rather than concise bullet point memos. Her longer note to me is filled with verbs. An actor understands verbs. The Maestro phrase is “Actors perform actions; all actions are verbs.”  “Focus and create.”  Artists do this well.

The inequity in funding for arts in educational programming, fine arts facility construction, and fine arts equipment is historical. Even in the U.S. Department of Education I learned that the Office of Innovation and Improvement, who supports art in education, is equally limited (and in my opinion, embarrassingly limited) in the budget they are allotted. I was shocked when I compared their budget with the budget of the office for Title 1 and Title 2. Title 1 and Title 2 money targets students’ academic performance and teacher training. And despite generations of statistics that prove that involvement in the arts improves academic performance and keeps kids in schools, administrators still do not equally support the arts. Why can’t administrators hear the power of the verbs “improve” and “keep”?

The current trend to overwhelmingly fund science, technology, engineering, math (STEM) programs is dangerous. School boards and principals will funnel Title 1 and 2 grants away from humanities programs (which include the arts) because no principal wants to be slapped in the face with low performance scores. No principal wants the embarrassment of having a school closed. That pressure is immense, especially in rural communities where the school is the anchor for jobs and the heartbeat for local economy. So long as we have school performance tests, money will go to those areas to insure additional funds and to successfully meet the right amount of penciled in bubbles. So long as we have money tied into school performance tests, local legislators will interpret federal recommendations and policy to benefit their constituents and disregard the ethical intent of the grants.

Do not get me wrong, I do not want a test for theatre to justify federal grants because many of the skills the fine arts teach cannot be penciled into a bubble. I understand the need to learn STEM skills, but not at the expense of what the humanities teach:  how to think, how to communicate, how to solve, how to see what is not there, to name a few. Art skills taught me how to turn lack of resources into resourcefulness, how to take risks and leave a family farm and dismiss cultural pressures to stay home. I am a fulltime teacher and also run four other businesses. I add to the local economy via my art skills. The arts taught me entrepreneurship. Most students that take fine arts or even major in fine arts to do not become “professional artists”, yet those who do deserve a loud applause. But notice that many students that major in accounting do not become accounts or students who major in history do not become museum curators. Many of the acting majors from my college class became very good lawyers and no one questions that their acting skills are valued in a court room.

“Focus on creating your world,” JJ said. The art educator is persistent, and I think our best skill is the ability to see what is not there…yet. Despite inadequate funding we will continue to produce art. Despite inadequate funding we will continue to educate kids and provide them opportunities to succeed. Why would we do this when so many teachers feel underappreciated and ignored? Because the teacher, like the artist, is also passionate. And when you follow your passion, well happiness triumphs over pessimism.

Upon my return, I shared my experience with my students. I cried a lot Friday because like many artists and teachers, I’m philosophical and sensitive and in my heart I know what is ethically correct. I cried because I hate feeling and sounding cynical. I also cried when I told my students about A.S. Johnston High School where Celeste Rodriguez-Jensen attended school in east Austin.

Celeste is the director of The Teacher Liaison National Engagement Team for The U.S. Department of Education, the program that invited me to DC. Celeste is also one of my alumni. I was filled with pride as I saw my once 17-Rick Garcia and Celeste Rodriguez-Jensenyear-old student incorporate her UIL One-Act-Play stage manager skills to coordinate a national gathering of teachers. I mentioned to Secretary King, that her school closed her junior year because the school failed to meet academic standards. Yet here she was in the same room, in charge and successful. The Every Student Succeeds Act should include all the future Celeste Rodriguez’s in fine arts programs across the country who are practicing skills to better our world.

My first trip to Washington DC was tough but appreciated. The National Mall exudes art:  the designs, the museums, the lighting, the architecture, the history and stories preserved. Thank you Secretary King for listening to my stories. I teach at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Upper School in Austin, TX. I will continue to pray for your leadership and not worry about those critical of separation of church and state. And regarding this particular issue of educating kids, I will also pray that the gap close between between Washington DC and the states and districts. “Think globally. Act locally” is a great slogan, but I still believe that there are those in power who are better positioned to fight for change on a large scale. Thank you for allowing this soldier’s input. Thank you Celeste for being a model of how every student can succeed.

Thank you, JJ Jonas for all you do in Salado, TX. And thank you to all the fine arts teachers who continue to create resourcefulness from lack of resources. Thank you for making students’ success your trophies. Oh, and thank you JJ for the verbs. “All actions are verbs.”  Actors know actions.

Rick Garcia was one of 14 fine arts educators who were invited to Washington DC to meet with Secretary of Education, John B. King Jr. August 31, 2016. You can learn more about the monthly “Tea With Teachers” gathering and also sign up for the newsletter, The Teachers Edition at U.S. Department of Education www.ed.gov

 

 

 

Letting Go

I am a control freak.  “Hi, my name is Renee and I am a control freak.”  (Admitting the problem is the first step, right?)  I am sure my husband is excited to read that I am confessing this flaw.  Actually, until now,  I thought I was only a control freak when directing a show.   I am such a perfectionist and I have a hard time letting go. I want the show to be perfect, so I control so many aspects of it.

This week, I have come to the realization that my husband might be right.  I have seen where I micromanage in other areas.  Mainly, I have learned that I have a hard time letting go when I am not sure of the end result.  I guess that is why most of us control situations, so we can control the outcome.  I think I sometimes “hold tight to the reins”  when I am insecure.  If I control the situation, no one will know that I am unsure of my skill.  Silly, this is when I should let go more and learn from those I am teaching.  This leads me to what I have discovered about myself in the first week of teaching in my new school.

I am going explain my situation modeling the  “Unfortunately/Fortunately” game.  (This activity can be found on page 184 of 100+ Activities & Games for the Body, Voice, and Imagination.)

  • Fortunately, I have been blessed with a department of students who are very self-sufficient.
  • Unfortunately, I have started the school year implementing all of my ideas, warm-ups, and structure without considering the success these students have had with the procedures they already have in place.
  • Unfortunately, they have been accepting of my new ideas and have jumped on board with me.
  • Unfortunately, I am taking away their sense of ownership and their incredible fortitude.
  • Fortunately, I have a friend who reminded me that students need to be empowered to reach their full potential.

I am blessed to be in a department with students who are willing to meet me where I am.  They have been respectful, willing, and adaptable.    I need to enter next week with a fresh attitude – willing to let go of some control.  My job is to empower students to be productive on their own, not micromanage their every move.  Thank goodness I am realizing this after week one and not at week thirty-six.

How will I begin empowering the students I have?    First, I have to stop trying to control every aspect of our department.   From experience, I know that when the right kids are given responsibility and goals, they aspire beyond my expectations.  This gives them a sense of achievement.  What better skill does a student need when walking out into the world after graduation.

While researching this idea, I found a great blog by Celina Brennan (who is actually an elementary school teacher, but I think most of what she says applies to high school kids, too.)   Her blog can be found at http://www.wholechildeducation.org/blog/empower-students-5-powerful-strategies.  In this blog, I found some great ideas to begin letting go and letting students continue to develop and strengthen their own potential.

I am going to engage conversation with my students encouraging them to reflect and assess. I want them to reflect on the last couple of years and what they have done that works and what they have done that does not work.  Not only will this help us develop a strategy to continue or maybe strengthen what they were doing, but also to give them some closure on the past.  I want them to know that closure does not mean all things in the past were bad, it means that one era is over and another is beginning.  This will help them discover their own strengths and analyze their weaknesses.  I hope this will also model how, throughout the year, we need to do some reflection and assessment with each project our department tackles.

I am restructuring my lesson plans with my advanced theatre students – both acting classes and  tech classes.  I am going to allow them time to teach me what they know.  Maybe it is good I started with my own ideas and expectations so they know I can take control, but I think I need to allow them time to express their knowledge.  We all know the best learning comes from teaching.

This process will assist my new students in developing goals for themselves, the class, and/or the department.  Instead of forcing my routines and ideas on them, I am going to take a step back and listen to what they want to accomplish.  I hope this will open up conversation that will inspire them to achieve more than any of us thought possible.   I believe in the philosophy that together we discover so much more than we do individually.   It is time I put this into practice.

In the speech and debate world, I always encouraged students to take ownership in their performances and develop their own process for meeting their goals.  I would say,  “I am not in that room with you, you need to figure it out.”  For some reason, I find this more difficult with theatre.   This is where my micromanaging comes to play.  I feel I must control the outcome because it is MY production; but as my friend reminded me, ultimately, it is their show.  It is time I incorporate my speech and debate philosophy to my  approach with educational theatre.

Do not get me wrong.  I believe students need guidance.  I believe they need boundaries.  They need a coach that allows them to aspire to greatness, one who will encourage, protect, and assist them along the way.  I know that I can provide those things.  I also know I have knowledge that they do not have and experiences they have not had which can help guide them along their journey.  I am fortunate that I have inherited students with some pretty strong skills.  It is evident in the current strength of the officers, thespian troupe, my advanced students and throughout the department.  It is my job to allow them to continue to test their wings and not handicap them with my need to micromanage.

So, today, I am beginning my journey of letting go by coaching, not micromanaging,  some already talented and responsible young adults.  I welcome this new challenge in my life.  Maybe, I will try this at home, too.