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Looking Back and Looking Forward

As teachers, we’re accustomed to referring to two different calendars—-the traditional yearly calendar and our school calendar (which usually has every square filled using multiple colors of pens, some pencil marks, a few highlighted areas, some scratch-outs, various arrows pointing to additions that would no longer fit into the square for that particular date, and check marks by items that have been completed. It makes me tired just looking at it! The great thing about living with two calendars, however, is that while everyone else is celebrating the end of 2017, teachers are also able to look forward to the rest of the school year and the experiences it will bring (and to celebrate its end in May or June). This is also a great time to look back for a moment and reflect.

As I take a moment to look back, I find myself asking the following questions:

  1. What worked? To answer this question, take a moment to make a list of the things you’ve accomplished this year (or school year so far if you’re wearing your teacher “hat” at the moment). Don’t spend so much time looking forward that you don’t take the time to acknowledge the positive things that have already happened. Whether it’s in your personal or professional life, what new things have you learned that will now make life easier or happier? Which goals have you accomplished? How has your life been impacted in a positive way? How have you impacted others in a positive way? What is better now than it was in 2016 (or before the 2017-18 school year started)? What (or who) has brought you joy?My “to do” lists are always filled—up and down the page, in the margins, front and back of the paper—-with all the tasks I need to complete. When I look back at one of these lists as I transfer the few items left on the old, scratched-out list to a new page so I can continue to list more tasks, my first thought is, “No wonder I’m so tired!”. That is quickly followed by the satisfaction that somehow I have been able to get those things done that at one time I felt were insurmountable. Take a moment to reflect on the good. It will remind you of your purpose.
  2. What didn’t work? This one can be painful, but we need to reflect on what didn’t work if we want to learn and grow. Over two decades ago, I directed the Teahouse of the August Moon, John Patrick’s Pulitzer award winning play. I’ve always remembered Sakini’s words from his opening monologue, “Pain make man think, thought make man wise, wisdom make life endurable”. Recalling failures is not a time to merely complain or indulge in self-pity. This is a time of honest and sometime uncomfortable reflection. What things did you experience that made your life more difficult or impacted you in a negative way? Which goals did you not accomplish and how could you have done things differently? How did you impact others in a negative way and how were you impacted by others in a negative way? What is not as good as it was before this year started? What or who has stolen your joy? Think about what didn’t work. Resolve to learn from it and change it rather than repeat it.
  3. What/whom do you have to be thankful for/to? Gratitude is good for the soul. It takes the focus off yourself on places it on things and people who had a positive impact. It also makes us realize how truly blessed we are. I had a principal whose mantra was, “Many hands make the work light”. Most theatre departments have only one theatre teacher. It can be a bit lonely and stressful. But there are usually those who are willing to help along the way. Let them know that you appreciate what they’ve done for you. Sometimes, we don’t even realize how good we have it until a change occurs. Our school experienced a lot of changes this year with a new principal and a new director of fine arts. Both ladies who previously held these positions were exemplary. I am so blessed that both gentlemen who currently hold these positions are also exemplary. Change brought about uncertainty and fear, but I am so thankful that I continue to be supported as a teacher and director of theatre at my school by an amazing administrative team. Realize what and who you have and let them know that you appreciate them.

So now, it’s time to look forward, and I’m asking myself the following questions:

  1. What do I want to accomplish? How can I have a positive impact? Where/how can I continue to learn so I can continue to grow as a person, teacher, mother, wife, grandmother, etc…? What is going to truly bring me joy and what do I need to do to achieve it? Winning at contest is great, but it should not be the only goal. It shouldn’t even be the primary goal. Is that sometimes hard to remember? Absolutely! The goal is to tell the story in the best way possible. That’s all your truly have control over. Only you know where your students started the year and the trials and tribulations you’ve overcome as a group. There’s much to be celebrated if we’re willing to look past the trophies and medals.
  2. How can I learn from the mistakes I’ve made in the past? Do I need to re-evaluate my goals? What can I change? Sometimes we have to remind ourselves that we can’t change others. And sometimes, the change is to remove yourself or someone else from the situation. The only person you can control is you. Don’t allow others to steal your joy. Sometimes that means it is time to look for another teaching position because you no longer see yourself as being a good fit for your current position (or the school is no longer a good fit for you). Sometimes that means that casting changes need to occur. Sometimes it means we need to change the way we do things. Make changes when they’re needed. Learn from mistakes and move forward. As long as your pain makes you think and your thought makes you wise, it will lead to wisdom that will make life more endurable. (Thank you, Sakini and John Patrick!)
  3. Who do I need to surround myself with? Who are the people that I know I’ll be thanking at the end of the year for making my life easier, better, and happier? Who is going to bring joy to my life and the lives of the people I love and care about? How can I bring joy to the people I come in contact with each day? As Mark Twain once said, “To get the full value of joy, you must have someone to divide it with”. Who will you choose to divide your joy with?

As 2017 comes to a close and we welcome 2018 and all the wonderful experiences that will be coming our way, I’d like to take this moment to say thank you to each of you who have purchased our curriculum, liked our Facebook page, attended a workshop, recommended our publications to other theatre educators, or in any way supported Maestro Theatre Publications, LLC.  May your 2018 be filled with happiness and success. May you and your students create many moments that will turn into precious memories. Most importantly, may be surrounded by love and by many wonderful people with whom you can divide your joy. Happy New year!

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